1 cent and 2 cent coins will soon be history. From the end of October 2015 retailers will be rounding your bill up or down to the nearest 5c, thus eliminating the need for the 1c and 2c. This will apply to the final total on your bill, not the individual cost of items. You will still find an item costing 99cent and that will remain.

You will not be asked about this. As long as there is a public notice in the shop, the retailer can round your bill up or down to the nearest 5c. Notices will start appearing in mid-October as the public are informed about the change.

Experiments have been on-going in the South East and proved to be cost-effective and are now being extended country-wide.

The following shows the effect:
Bills ending in 1c will change to 0c.1-cent 2-cent
Bills ending in 2c will change to 0c.
Bills ending in 3c will change to 5c.
Bills ending in 4c will change to 5c.
Bills ending in 5c will still end in 5c.
Bills ending in 6c will change to 5c.
Bills ending in 7c will change to 5c.
Bills ending in 8c will change to 10c.
Bills ending in 9c will change to 10c.
Bills ending in 10c will still end in 10c.

What to do if you have 1c or 2c
You will still be able to use these in shops e.g. 2 X 2c and 1 X 1c to make 5c. As the shops take them in they will be lodged in the banks. The banks will pass them on to the Central Bank who will withdraw them from circulation.

Many of these coins end up in charity piggy banks which means that many new ones had to be minted which put costs up. These piggy banks can be emptied and the contents lodged in the banks.

There will be a substantial amount of time where the coins still remain legal tender and so can still be used.